Fairy tales are supposed to make people believe in the power of love and the power of wishing. However, no one really knows what happened after the credits rolled.

    No one knows if Cinderella was so used to not having anything that she became a shopaholic and went bankrupt or if Rapunzel’s beautician slipped up and accidentally cut her hair in a stylish bob. Okay, so this definitely didn’t happen, but the musical “Into The Woods” gets to the truth behind the beloved fairytales.

    “I was raised watching the Disney movies like Cinderella and I’ve been raised to hear a different ending to the fairytales,” said President of Las Mascaras Joshua Eguia. “But once seeing ‘Into The Woods,’ you believe that in the real world these stories would have ended differently.”

Others weren’t so let down about the twisted truth.

    “I was excited. Very, very, excited! The first thing I knew about ‘Into The Woods’ is that it was based off the Brothers Grimm which was very dark,” said sophomore art major Megan Bryant.

    The fairytale musical “Into The Woods” is based off The Brothers Grimm, the original writers of many well-known fairytales which Disney later transformed.   The Brothers intended for a more realistic effect instead of the common idea of happily ever after.

    “You learn so much more from these fairy tales now than you did hearing them as a small child,” said Eguia.

    After playing on Broadway, “Into The Woods” is making its way to Wise Auditorium in hopes of opening college students’ eyes to the bare honesty it portrays.

    “The audience should walk away with a general understanding that life isn’t always striving for what you want. Sometimes it’s striving to do your best and to problem solve bad situations,” said Bryant.

    Although “Into The Woods” is a musical, it shouldn’t be viewed as a typical musical.

    “It’s different from other musicals, because it deals with real-life issues, unfaithfulness and greed,” said Eguia.

    While the musical gives the audience the drama they crave, the question still remains, what produces a happily ever after?

    “The whole happily ever after is relative to what one person thinks. It’s different for everyone. If you have a positive outlook and don’t dwell on things, everything will work out fine,” said sophomore Apache Belle, MK Northum.

    Every fairy tale has a meaning and some kind of relevant truth.

    “Wanting is more pleasurable than having. It’s not logical but often true,” said director Dr. David Crawford. “The philosophy of absolutes in life is everything has shades of truth and untruth.”

    The musical starts its journey at 7:30 P.M, Feb. 23 in Wise Auditorium. Tickets will go on sale Feb. 16 in the Jean Brown Theater box office for $5.

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