Art students Amber Hernandez and David Brown sold their paintings for a total value over $700 at the art walk in Jenkins Hall.

Comment sheets were placed among the ongoing paintings to give advice or simply compliment the artists for their efforts.

“We’ve had comment sheets next to the piece to give them feedback,” said Derrick White, art professor of TJC. “It’s generally very positive.”

Both students were the lucky ones to stand out from the crowd and become recognized by buyers and auctioneers who wanted their artwork. In fact, Brown sold his “Space Cadet” to one buyer for $600. The piece gives off a “Pulp Fiction” vibe to the viewer, and fans of pulp science would know how Brown received inspiration for this piece from the original 1934 Flash Gordon series.

Out of all illustrations of pulp science, Flash Gordon has been celebrated for over seventy years with its colorful richness. This piece from the retired Army veteran has been a tribute to the ‘30s era.

“That was another thing about the pulp illustration was that you had to have the colors just pop out at you in order to grab people’s attention,” said Brown.

From pulp illustrations to personal worth, another painting on display is one of a peacock that came from a special art student, Amber Hernandez. Growing up in Dallas Amber had spent some time with her grandfather, who inspired the art.

“We chased them around for fun, but we never caught them,” said Hernandez, art student.

From a Mexican descendent, Hernandez’ grandpa not only spent the cherished time with his granddaughter but also was a musician.

“He played the guitar, and he sang a little bit in a Mexican band back in the ‘70s,” said Hernandez.

“I couldn’t really tell you what the name was…every night we would sing a song before I went to bed; he would play the guitar, and we would both sing.”

Hernandez’ grandfather had passed away when she was seven years old, and she has kept him in her thoughts as well as in her art. Her peacock painting shows of how she had got her inspiration.

“My grandpa [had] passed away, and I wanted to do a painting that would remind me of him,” said Hernandez. “…and I used the real feathers to resemble what we use to do together.”

All students and faculty will be able to view the art walk in the Art Department corridor in Jenkins from Oct. 24 through Nov. 18.

 

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