The Tyler Police Department and the Tyler Junior College Police Department are still investigating drug operations on the TJC campus after seven people were arrested in connection to narcotics.

Andrew Haffert, 21, Austin Wyche, 21, Christopher “Trap” McGee, 19, Otis Johnson Jr., 22, Brittani Bell, 19, and David Scott, 21, were all arrested March 19. Police arrested Christopher “Kingpin” King, 19, at his apartment on Calloway Road on March 22. They seized $2,000 worth of pot along with drug paraphernalia. These arrests concluded a two-month undercover drug operation in conjunction with the Tyler Police Department.

“We sought assistance from the Tyler Police Department in January after campus safety saw suspicious activity,” said Fred Peters, Director of Marketing and Public Information at TJC. “We needed the undercover aspect to make these arrests.”

According to Tyler Police, an undercover agent was placed and then purchased illicit narcotics from several of the suspects on campus.

“The suspects were selling a combination of marijuana, pills and hydrocodone,” said Martin.

Three of the suspects arrested have previous records.

Andrew Haffert was arrested Nov. 14, 2006, for possession of marijuana and was sentenced to 15 months of probation, 24 hours of community service and a $200 fine. He was arrested again June 5, 2007, after revoking probation and was sentenced to 75 days in county jail.

Austin Wyche was first arrested May 28, 2009, for theft. He was sentenced to a year of probation, 100 hours of community service and a $100 fine. He was arrested for a second time Aug. 6, 2009, for theft and was sentenced to 45 days in the county jail. He was arrested for a third time Feb. 18, 2010, for revoking probation and was sentenced to spend another 180 days in jail along with a $100 fine.

Otis Johnson was arrested Jan. 3, 2007, for theft and was sentenced to 40 days in county jail.

The seven people arrested in the drug operation were arrested on several different charges.

Christopher King, 20, was charged with two counts of delivery of marijuana ¼ oz<5 lbs. These are both state jail felonies. He was released on bonds totaling $130,000.

Andrew Haffert was charged with one count of delivery of marijuana ¼ oz<5 lbs in a drug free zone. This is a third-degree felony. He was released on a $75,000 bond.

Austin Wyche was charged with one count of delivery of marijuana ¼ oz<5 lbs. in a drug free zone which is a third-degree felony and one count criminal conspiracy to deliver marijuana in a drug-free zone which is a state jail penalty. He was released on bonds totaling $60,000.

Christopher “Trap” McGee was charged with two counts of delivery of marijuana ¼ oz<5 lbs in a drug-free zone, which is a 3rd degree felony, one count of delivery of marijuana <1/4 oz in a drug-free zone, which is a state jail felony, theft of property $50< $500, which is a class B misdemeanor, one count of delivery of a controlled substance PG3<28 grams in a drug free zone, which is a 3rd degree felony, two counts of criminal conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance in a drug-free zone, which is a third-degree felony and one count of unlawful delivery of a simulated substance in a drug-free zone, which is a state jail felony. He was released on bonds totaling $215,060. On March 22, 2010, he was also charged with driving without a valid Texas driver's license. He was issued a $242 fine and a $484 bond.

Otis Johnson Jr. was charged with one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance in a drug-free zone which is a third-degree felony. He was released on a $30,000 bond.

Brittani Bell was charged with one count of criminal conspiracy to deliver a controlled substance in a drug-free zone, which is a third-degree felony. She was released on a $30,000 bond.

David Scott was charged with one count of delivery of marijuana ¼ oz<5 lbs., which is a state jail felony.

Investigators are still investigating and believe that more arrests will be made in connection with these drugs.

According to Peters, TJC is happy with the arrests.

“We have a zero-tolerance policy. Some of these acts were very blatant and during the daytime,” said Peters. “We needed to make a strong statement and this is not something we will tolerate.”

“People have to understand the consequences of their actions,” said Student Senate President Austin Witherspoon. “Hopefully, they will wake up and learn from their mistakes.”

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