Facebook and Myspace are great ways to communicate and stay in touch with friends from all over the place.

Although it may seem like a blessing that people have the availability to upload pictures and updates online for friends and family to see, it can also destroy someone’s reputation.

Anyone can be affected by comments or photographs posted on Facebook and other social networking sites.

According to ESPN.com, a Philadelphia Eagles employee was recently fired due to a Facebook comment the employee had posted venting about his frustration with the team.

Students recently were reminded that anyone could be affected by information posted online, whether they are just students at a college or a professional with a career.

Tyler Junior College recently had an incident with pictures posted on Facebook featuring TJC students at a party where alcohol was involved.

An anonymous source approached Vincent Nguyen, director of student life and involvement, with the pictures of the students.

“These students are looked up to with respect, and they are supposed to represent us,” Nguyen said.

When these students were punished and removed from their “leadership” positions on campus, a few asked whether their treatment was fair.”I personally believe that my tuition money should not go to stalking myself and my friends on Facebook,” Ryan Leroy, a TJC student at the party, said. “Teachers and Staff should not micro-manage students’ lives. It’s not their position to be parents. College is about becoming an adult. We will never be able to if you do not let us make our own mistakes and learn from them on our own.”

On the other hand, the faculty at TJC feel that these students are role models and their behavior does not represent TJC very well.

“When they are drinking and smoking, we have other students come up to us and ask if this is really someone that we want to represent us,” Nguyen said.

Multiple students were affected by this Facebook scandal and were removed from their leadership positions. Many feel some frustration towards the actions that were taken by the administration.

“The faculty that is getting paid by the school needs to worry more about the school and what they are paid to do, rather than sitting on the computer going through students’ Facebook and Myspace profiles,” said Lauren Parrish, former TJC cheerleader who was removed from her position due to Facebook content. “My dad is a cop and can look at my Facebook at anytime, and if I am OK with him seeing my page then you know it is not bad.”

Students are frustrated and feel that their experience at TJC has been damaged due to this situation and feel that everything that they once had has been taken away from them.

“I lost my sports announcing job, lost my position on Student Senate and lost my internship with the Frisco Rough Riders due to the photos on my Facebook of the party held at my house,” TJC student Matt Sneed said.

According to Sneed, he has lost friendships and relationships due to other students being instructed to not be affiliated with him.

“I have learned more in the past six months than I ever have. I learned what is and isn’t acceptable and that when you are in a leadership position, someone is constantly watching you,” Sneed said.

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