Tracy Williams, Licensed Professional Counselor of Tyler Junior College, has seen a significant rise in students needing counseling due to the pressure of upcoming finals.

“One of the main things I see students for is test anxiety because a lot of the college grade is made up of tests and if students have anxiety, they don’t perform as well,” said Williams.

Williams said that a lot of the time she sees students who are overwhelmed and some that may have taken on too many classes.

TJC student Shannon Speaks agrees that finals are putting more stress on her. She is taking five classes and has to find time to study equally for each one. However, Speaks said that she refuses to let the workload get to her.

“I want to make something out of myself. That’s the only thing that keeps me going,” said Speaks.

A lot of students are trying to work and be involved with extracurricular activities while going to school full time.

“A lot of times it’s just talking to professors, talking to employers, talking to advisors and finding out really what your options are,” said Williams.

“I study everything I have to study. I turn in my homework and I keep up with my classes,” said Nohemi Villegas, Vision Care Technology Major.

Paying for college also adds to the stress. Having to choose between paying a light bill and paying for college is among the list of added pressures.

“I have to make good grades in order to get into my program and I am also working to take care of myself,” said Sydnee Dowden, nursing major.

Some find shelter in their FASFA or their student aid while for other’s financial aid plays a big role in the stress on campus. Some students have had to resort to dropping out of a class or two due to receiving their refund money late.

“I also encourage students to talk to their academic advisors because dropping a class or withdrawing from a class can have an affect on their financial aid,” said Williams. “It may have an impact on how much you can borrow in the future.”

One thing that can resolve that issue is doing the financial aid process early. If there are any complications, another result may be to borrow a friend’s book or go to the library.

“I’m with financial aid and if we don’t pass, we don’t get financial aid. So there’s a lot of pressure with that,” said Naomi Giron, biology major.

“You have to cut off the things that cause you the least problems and the first thing to do is to really go in on your study time and put your academics first because it’s (the semester) only a few more weeks,” said Williams.

Williams works on a plan for each student according to what he or she may be stressing over. She encourages students to talk to their professors about concerns regarding their grades.

 

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