Tyler Junior College has updated its lanyard policy to maintain safety on campus and stay cost efficient.

The updated policy has been in effect since Feb 1.

Under the new policy, if a student forgets his or her lanyard, he or she will be issued a day pass. After one free day pass, a fine will be billed to the student’s place of residence. The old policy stated, if a student was caught without a lanyard, the first offense would be a warning along with a day pass, the second time a letter would be sent informing the student that if it were to happen again the student would face suspension, and the third strike was expulsion.

TJC established its policy on Aug. 23, 2010. In order to keep trespassers off of campus.

There had been numerous reports of disturbances on campus and a couple of cases of drugs being distributed by those who were not students.

The lanyard policy made it simpler for TJC staff to identify who belonged on campus and who did not.

The fine billed to students is a cost recovery charge. It’s not a ticket. Director of Campus Safety, Dr. Tom Johnson said “All it is, is recovering some of the money that we spend keeping up with the day pass itself.”

With the new system, tracking students is more efficient and convenient. All it takes is just one call from the security ambassador to the Campus Safety Office and the student will be logged in.

Identifying people without a lanyard is easier now as well because after the call is made, the dispatcher can look in the system and see whether the person is a student at TJC.

If a student is stopped without a lanyard, a security

ambassador can issue a day pass on the spot, as opposed to having the student go to the sub-station.

Corp. Peggy Scott said, “the amount of paperwork involved, in just keeping track, sending out the letters, the time finding the student and the post cards and letters sent to Damien Williams. With this way (policy) we are putting this on their account one time. Done.”

Two dollars and 50 cents may not seem like much, but if a student neglects to pay the fee, a “hold” may be placed on a student’s academic record.

Most holds prevent students from obtaining their transcripts.

Students will not be able to register for any class till the hold is removed from his or her account.

Johnson said, “a hold that is placed on an account

if students fail to pay the fee.

A hold can also be placed for non-monetary things: not returning books or failing to meet with judicial affairs if one were called upon.”

Some student think the new policy will be for the best, and will still maintain its integrity to keeping the students safe.

“I think it’s a better solution than suspension,” said

science major Michael Tran.

“Regardless of students being fined, it will take some time before all students remember to wear their lanyard while on campus. It’s all about compliance.”

Tran also said it’s also a way to give students some

peace of mind that only students and staff members are allowed on campus.

 

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