President Barack Obama said the economy would get worse before it gets better.

The unemployment rate has continued to climb in recent months and prices on household items have done nothing but the same.

Economic analysts argue as to what will bring us out of this recession, but no one has the answer. They argue the bailout money should be given back to the taxpayers. Others believe that the money should have gone to building a stronger future and been spent on education. One way or another, the economy is affecting TJC.

Ronald Regan said in a speech when he was running for president, “a recession is when your neighbor loses his job. A depression is when you lose yours.”

TJC student Josh Aaron felt the economies wrath last October when he lost his job at the warehouse where he was working. He had been working there for 14 months.

“At first I couldn’t believe it. I was shocked,” Aaron said. “You hear about stuff like that happening but think it could never happen to you.”

Some students argue the economy hasn’t affected them, but it soon will. Students have seen what effects the economy has done to them and their family’s finances, but it’s also having an effect on the college itself, positively and negatively.

“It has affected us,” said Vincent Nguyen, director of student life and involvement. “We are trying to be good stewards of the students and taxpayers money.”

The economy has not had a complete negative effect on TJC. Brian Thurman, director of purchasing, has seen the college’s enrollment grow. Due to the economy, people are wanting to gain new skills to allow them to find employment.

There was a thought that TJC was going to close Potter Hall for the summer to save cost, but Thurman doesn’t believe that to be the case.

“TJC is not closing Potter Hall, but may be looking to gain any savings possible on utilities in buildings where there are opportunities for the summer to reduce expense.”

The college is also doing things on a much smaller scale as well. Nguyen, at times, doesn’t turn the light on in his office.

“Every little bit counts, I have a lot of natural light so I don’t always need the additional light,” Nguyen said.

Turning off lights may seem small, but it makes a difference if it is done campus wide. Thurman said the lower the cost of utilities, the more the college saves.

Savings for the college means more money for the college and during these economic times that’s not only what the college is searching for but everyone is looking for.

According to economic analysts, the economy will bounce back and more than likely it will be back completely by the middle of 2010.”

“The $700 billion dollar bailout that was put into place recently will have an effect on the U.S. taxpayers,” President Barack Obama said. “It just takes time.”

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