Study songs picked by The DrumBeat

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By Santiago Nunez

Everyone is looking for ways to distract themselves from the impending doom and gloom of the final six weeks or, adversely, fully invest themselves inside of their textbooks. Here at the DrumBeat we love listening to music and sharing the love with our readers. In doing so we have compiled a list of some sweet melodies to get your earworms buzzing with joy (or melancholia, take your pick.) We hope you enjoy the following assortment of songs; we sure did.


Courtesy of The Rare Occasions

Futureproof – The Rare Occasions

To be future proof is to be immune to the inescapable grasp of time, something so inherently impossible that this ode to the idea is made all the more relatable to anyone who struggles with the passage of life, the changing seasons, and the words of past lovers. This high energy indie rock song is juxtaposed with existential lyrical content. The drums, bass and electric guitars are ever present in the song; their rich tones make up for Brian McLaughlin’s more subdued vocals. “Futureproof” is a letter to ignorance and denial.

Courtesy of Sony Music

Trepanation- Millennium Parade

Millenium Parade is a relatively new group led by Daiki Tsuneta, also of Japan’s King Gnu, but with this art pop effort they sound like a band knee deep with experience. The song title is a metaphor for drilling into the mind of someone else, through memories. The speaker in this instance describes the pain they feel from losing someone through a vocal modulator and over booming claps, horns and hi hats. The sonic journey “Trepanation” takes you on is remarkable, the thunderous sounds eventually simmer down into a low roar, symbolically representing the frantic experience that is loss.

I Bet on Losing Dogs – Mitski

Courtesy of Dead Oceans

In an outpour of emotion, indie rock sweetheart, Mitski, entails her struggle of being in love with people she cannot obtain, those who are too emotionally damaged to be cared for and cannot reciprocate her affection. She implores them to stay with her and believe in the fantasy that it will all work out, despite all odds. The long and drawn-out synths coupled with Mitski’s vocals layered over the guitar riffs mirrors how Mitski draws out her relationships despite them being doomed from the start. Mitski is betting on losing dogs by hedging her bets on foolish and blinded obsession. She is a losing dog herself in the sense that she will never win at love.

Waves – Dean Lewis

Courtesy of Island Australia

Life is not always a bright and sunny day. Sometimes clouds loom overhead with the threat of heavy rain ready to disrupt it. Folk pop artist Dean Lewis expresses this notion in “Waves.” Lewis uses water as a direct symbol for both powerful and negative emotion. A minimalist approach is deployed in terms of instrumentation, this is to better highlight Lewis’ powerful vocals. The song uses weather to describe the state of mind Lewis finds himself in with many mentions of wind, storms and obviously waves, which all represent his negative mental health and the feeling that his youth and the stability that comes with it is gone.

Courtesy of RCA Records

Found – Tems

Neo-soul has been a breeding ground for some incredibly touching and emotional songs about love and affection. Nigerian singer Tems looks to add to that history with help from Brent Faiyaz. Scars from past relationships are deeper than just the pain of losing someone. Sometimes the pain stems from a feeling of inadequacy. Tems focuses all that emotion in the song “Found.” Simple and light 808s working with the tenderness of an acoustic guitar puts all the focus on the voices of the singers. Tems’ unique voice feels loud yet unheard,contrasting Faiyaz’ subtle and attentive words. Together they highlight the emotional intimacy of “Found.”

The New Day – Greta Van Fleet

To be future proof is to be immune to the inescapable grasp of time, something so inherently impossible that this ode to the idea is made all the more relatable to anyone who struggles with the passage of life, the changing seasons, and the words of past lovers. This high energy indie rock song is juxtaposed with existential lyrical content. The drums, bass and electric guitars are ever present in the song; their rich tones make up for Brian McLaughlin’s more subdued vocals. “Futureproof” is a letter to ignorance and denial.

Courtesy of Dual Tone

Let Loose – Mt. Joy

To be future proof is to be immune to the inescapable grasp of time, something so inherently impossible that this ode to the idea is made all the more relatable to anyone who struggles with the passage of life, the changing seasons, and the words of past lovers. This high energy indie rock song is juxtaposed with existential lyrical content. The drums, bass and electric guitars are ever present in the song; their rich tones make up for Brian McLaughlin’s more subdued vocals. “Futureproof” is a letter to ignorance and denial.

Courtesy of Foreign Family

Better Now – ODESZA

To be future proof is to be immune to the inescapable grasp of time, something so inherently impossible that this ode to the idea is made all the more relatable to anyone who struggles with the passage of life, the changing seasons, and the words of past lovers. This high energy indie rock song is juxtaposed with existential lyrical content. The drums, bass and electric guitars are ever present in the song; their rich tones make up for Brian McLaughlin’s more subdued vocals. “Futureproof” is a letter to ignorance and denial.

Courtesy of Hyperdub

Hiders – Burial

Burial strays away from his usual style on “Hiders” as we see him take on an entirely different direction that contrasts with the other tracks on the same EP. If this could be described by a single sentence, it’d be an upbeat journey through an abandoned city while crying. There are so many things happening at every point of this song, from the chopped-up vocals, to the grandiose build up, all the way up to the climax of the song where a barrage of hi hats combine with the delicious synths. Burial delivers a beautifully well-made song to add to his beautifully well-made catalog of ambiance.

Courtesy of Independent Label Group

Oh Well, Oh Well – Mayday Parade

After the departure of Mayday Parade’s lead man, Derek Sanders was left to care for the bands vocals alone. After an album of experimentation, Mayday Parade came into their own on their self-titled LP “Mayday Parade” with the opening track “Oh Well, Oh Well.” The track is everything pop-punk was in the early 2000s, but with 2010s production. Fast paced guitars, loud vocals, and angsty lyrics make this emo anthem for the ages. Derek Sanders’ details their unrequited love with vulnerable lines about his rejected proposals, nightly escapades and emotional crises.

To find a full playlist that includes all of the songs visit, https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5K5I2BDzHLm6lQ95a2qqBH?si=a7df21a83ba547ab.